Niger election holds as they search for a switch in the first democratic elected president

Niger began counting votes on Sunday during the general election, which is expected to lead to the first-ever West African country between two democratically elected leaders. The capture would be a shining spot for a country that has seen four times since independence from France in 1960, with poverty and Islamist violence killing hundreds of civilians and soldiers in the past year alone. “We are very important because we are seen as the masters of the rebellion,” said Massaoudou Abdou, 50, at a school in the town of Maradi in southern Niger. He said, “In 60 years of independence, this is the first time,” referring to the transfer of power from one elected president to another.

There were no reports of violence at all. Former Interior Minister Mohamed Bazoum, a political party candidate, is the preferred candidate to replace President Mahamadou Issoufou, who resigned after two years in office. of 23 million. Bazoum, 60, has vowed to continue Issoufou’s prophecy, and has also promised to eradicate widespread corruption. “I am very proud that this (election) was honored,” he said after the election in Niamey on Sunday. The election has always been seen as a victory for Niger.

Al Qaeda-linked terrorists in ISIL are carrying out attacks near its western city walls in Mali and Burkina Faso, including a January attack that killed 89 militants. Hundreds of kilometers east, militants Boko Haram operates in its southeastern region of Nigeria. Outgoing President Issoufou said after the election that the election marked a “special day” that laid the “stone of hope” for the next generation. More than 40 percent of Niger’s population is poor, the COVID-19 epidemic has slowed

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